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Airbrushing Varnishes

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This topic contains 6 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by  panzerkaput 1 month, 2 weeks ago.

Viewing 7 posts - 1 through 7 (of 7 total)
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  • #1656905

    panzerkaput
    20960xp
    Cult of Games Member

    I am on a wonderful and slow journey of airbrushing and I really only use my airbrush at the prime my figures and terrain with. But I am thinking that maybe I could varnish my figures with an airbrush, so I am asking a couple of questions here.

    Firstly, is using an airbrush to varnish miniatures and terrain any good with an airbrush? I am guessing that you will then to gloss and matt varnishes as normal in a couple or so coats.

    Secondly, if it is good to varnish your miniatures this way then what are the best varnishes to get?

    Thirdly, do these varnished need to be thinned to be used through an airbrush? It be the same way that you want thin paint normally with thinner/flow improver or is it another way to use them?

    Thanks

    #1656953

    sundancer
    31590xp
    Cult of Games Member

    I’m leaving a dot here for the answers. Sadly I can’t provide any answers from experience but I’d like to learn the secrets as well.

    Judging from what other people do on the youtubes I think varnish with an airbrush is a thing? maybe…

    #1656954

    panzerkaput
    20960xp
    Cult of Games Member

    For me I am still learning and I have send the the youtube guys and each one of them is a little helpful.

    #1657027

    warcolours
    Participant
    251xp

    Absolutely yes. Since I have an airbrush I have not spent a penny anymore on rattlecans either for priming or varnishing. The results are much better and the cost largely inferior. Plus you can varnish inside and do not have to worry about frosting anymore. You can also use varnish more often as a save point to seal the work done so far before attempting a trickier stage or for other purposes, like adding decals (after a gloss varnish) or using oil pin washes (gloss or satin varnish) and finishing everything with a matt varnish. My go to varnishes are Vallejo Polyurethane Varnishes. Consider that a 200ml bottle comes around 20ish euro and has lasted me a couple of years. I paint in average 3 to 5k miniatures per year. You can do the math…

    #1657028

    seldon9
    8699xp
    Cult of Games Member

    I use Vallejo gloss varnish through my airbrush. I thin it with Vallejo’s thinner first. It’s hard to give ratios ‘cos I just judge by eye when I think it’s thinned enough. Maybe around 50/50. Couple of coats does the job. I’ve not tried any other varnishes through my airbrush so I can’t compare.

    I had quite a few occasions where my airbrush would clog quickly. I found mixing the varnish and thinner outside the airbrush helped. Not sure what was getting in when I mixed in the cup. I think mixing outside the airbrush cup is generally a good habit to get into but particularly with gloss varnish.

    I rinse my brush through with warm, soapy water each time I empty the cup and when I’ve finished.

    I’ve not tried matt varnish through the airbrush. I’m not clear on the preparation needed to avoid frosting.

    I prefer to airbrush gloss ‘cos I thought I was losing details when I brushed on gloss. I’d find small gaps in my drybrushing or edge highlighting. Airbrushing gloss is a gentler way to apply protection in my opinion.

    #1657035

    warcolours
    Participant
    251xp

    Yes, of course you need to thin the varnish, I use both thinner and flow improver and have never had a problem with clogging. Mixing the varnish, or any other colour, outside the cup is a very good general rule: often the paint can have small bits of congealed paint that can go into the cup inadvertently and clog the airbrush. If you mix the paint or varnish outside the cup it is easy to spot and remove these.
    There is no special preparation needed to avoid frosting when airbrushing matt varnish: the fact is that you apply the varnish at a much lower pressure and at the same temperature of the room you are painting in and this is all that is needed to take care of the issue.

    #1657122

    panzerkaput
    20960xp
    Cult of Games Member

    Cheers guys for the advise

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