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Help with printing Flags professional

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  • #1541650

    panzerkaput
    15154xp
    Cult of Games Member

    I have a question about flags, printing them, etc. To be quite simple, does anyone have any professional or semi professional experience at printing flags for miniatures games or printing in general? I want to print off flags I have created and I am printing them on 160gsm super smooth paper using an inkjet printer. I actually get very good results but it I wanted to go down the more professional route I have a few questions.

    Firstly is a laser printer worth getting as opposed to a Inkjet, is the quality that noticeable?

    What weight of paper best?

    What type of paper is best?

    Is Illustrator better than Photoshop?

    Any help would be appreciated as I am not a professional printer, I am self taught, I am not a graphic designer and frankly I am struggling with all of this.

    Standards

    Thank you

    #1549963

    itsuncertainwho
    Participant
    161xp

    Firstly is a laser printer worth getting as opposed to a Inkjet, is the quality that noticeable?

    – I prefer a laser over inkjet. Ink cartridges and print heads want to be used at least every other day, and need to be run a couple times a week at the minimum. A color laser printer can sit unused for weeks/months without any ill effect.

    What weight of paper best? What type of paper is best?

    – This is case specific, but if you found what works for you then stick with it. I don’t deal with paper printing often at the day job in screen printing.

    Is Illustrator better than Photoshop?

    -Yes, but that is personal preference. Illustrator is my daily bread and butter. If you are concerned about fine detail and scalability of your graphics Illustrator is the way to go.

    Affinity Designer and Photo are great alternatives to both Adobe products for a cheap one time purchase instead of a subscription. They don’t have all the bells and whistles of Adobe but they can do a lot.

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