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Is there any point in a hobby lamp for army painting?

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This topic contains 10 replies, has 7 voices, and was last updated by  horati0nosebl0wer 1 month, 1 week ago.

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  • #1532238

    noyjatat
    10904xp
    Cult of Games Member

    So something I have found with a recent tank I painted is that in normal room light a lot of the details are lost. I painted it under a 40 watt hobby lamp and when I photographed it in the light booth it looks the same but in normal light, a lot of the work is lost. Now if the mini is going into a painting competition where you know they will put it under better lighting that’s fine but am I adding work or losing the look and wasting my time doing tabletop standard stuff under the lamp?

    IMG_20200525_183857609 (1)

    Under a good light

    IMG_20200530_175647627

    Normal room light

    • This topic was modified 1 month, 1 week ago by  noyjatat.
    • This topic was modified 1 month, 1 week ago by  noyjatat.
    #1532241

    sundancer
    22324xp
    Cult of Games Member

    I found good light helps a lot in painting. Details, warmth of colour etc.  And I use it for every project that fits on my table.

    #1532270

    noyjatat
    10904xp
    Cult of Games Member

    @sundancer I agree it is good for painting buddy. My issue is in the gaming hall they don’t look good because of the lighting so I reckon its better to paint for gaming room lighting which would mean not using a lamp.

    #1532286

    lloyd
    Keymaster
    13951xp

    I know what you mean, you might use brighter colours etc. if painting in a dimmer light so the mini would look more poppy in normal gaming light.

    But the hobby light for me is there to try and reduce eye strain and help see where the brush is actually going.

    It’s hard to paint details if they are concealed by shadow due to bad light.

    I guess you could try just lifting the mini out and setting it somewhere else for a 4 Foot test while painting.

    #1532316

    sundancer
    22324xp
    Cult of Games Member

    @noyjatat  now I get you. Sure, if you’re looking it at that angle. But then why bothering painting them up in the first place? 😉 But seriously: ask yourself, do you paint them in good light with high detail for yourself or for others? And even if details aren’t that prominent under normal lights, you’ll see a big difference when compared to someone who had done the “quick and dirty under normal lighting” job. At least I do.

    #1532327

    noyjatat
    10904xp
    Cult of Games Member

    @lloyd it does make me wonder can I achieve the same effect for a gaming room.

    @sundancer I actually paint for my opponents. I don’t game very often but do like to attend some events now and again. I think people like to play a nice looking force and with me barely knowing rules and not looking to come first they get an easy-going game with me.

    #1532479

    ced1106
    Participant
    2991xp

    Keep the hobby lamp, but don’t paint as many details.

    The hobby lamp is there to prevent eye strain and making painting easier. Doesn’t mean you have to paint details.

    Article on lamps (on the cheap) : https://geekandsundry.com/miniature-painting-101-the-importance-of-proper-lighting-for-your-painting-space/

    #1532696

    warbossd
    1828xp
    Cult of Games Member

    Hobby lampd are a good idea for many reasons. Always try to use ‘daylight’ balanced bulbs which have more blue wavelength light in them. They aren’t a ton more expensive than generic economy bulbs but give a better colour balance for painting by.

    #1532697

    sundancer
    22324xp
    Cult of Games Member

    it does make me wonder can I achieve the same effect for a gaming room.

    @noyjatat  Use daylight bulbs in the gaming room too 😉 But some people might scream “to bright” when they enter

    #1532770

    avicenna
    879xp
    Cult of Games Member

    I’d say keep the hobby lamp, but also review your painting under regular lighting too – if you cant see it under regular lighting increase the contrast. Whether that is with colour or shading/highlighting, it is what will make them ‘pop’. If you are painting for realism (on your panzer I for example) and would rather not exaggerate, then I’d just keep doing what you are doing if its about historical accuracy.

    #1532850

    I agree with @avicenna on the aim of how you’re painting. The issue is the scale we paint at. We need to bring out the pop effect for small things because well… they’re small. The 4’/4″ issue is the detail level you work on. There have been pretty well painted minis of armor here on the boards that have the high contrast edge highlights that break the planes of the flat paneling and make the shapes seem more visible.

    Last year as a gift to one of my brothers I picked up a Pz IV for Tanks and tried a desert camo pattern. It came out well enough but what made it pop was color. I see a dusting of field grime over the tank and it definitely is cool for larger model kits. That detail loses its punch in scale on the Pz I but you could kick it up with the alternating blue grey/brown pattern and then a light dust of grime around the tracks. Maybe some small bits of pulled pluck foam (in most any sue mini packaging) painted to look like foliage glued here and there could spice it up too without added cost for hobby materials.

    I guess the lighting issue gets skirted with all this but its all in what we end up with on the tabletop. As I was taught in an art class years ago “If it looks wrong, it is wrong”. Here its paint to what makes you happy and be sure that you are able to see the parts that make your minis cool.

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