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Bolt Action: Western Desert Boot Camp Live Blog - Saturday

Bolt Action: Western Desert Boot Camp Live Blog - Saturday

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Scorpions Of The Desert - Support Weapons

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To finish off the Scorpions of the Desert series, @oriskany takes us through the various support weapons the armies brought with them to the desert.

It’s time to look at tanks, artillery, and all the other big toys.

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warhammergrimace
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5173xp

We had a couple of 25 pounders at my unit on display, if you were a bad lad cleaning them was the your first tasks of the day.

deadhead
Member
1172xp

great dicussion

sneakyrabbit
Member
497xp

Interesting

robertoutram
Member
183xp

Great stuff guys

andre77
Member
5684xp

Lesson after lesson. Is this about educating me?

somegeezer
Member
8298xp

Embrace it. You might even like it πŸ˜€

dorthonion
Member
1529xp

Mortars and infantry guns were devastating as they were quicker to respond to the needs of their unit plus they are low velocity weapons so the projectiles carry a larger proportion of explosive and shrapnel compared to identical calibre howitzers or tank guns – the lower velocity means the body of the shell can be thinner as it does not have to withstand such a violent launch. More boom for the same buck. Plus mortars have a ferocious rate of fire.

rot6
Member
877xp

I would really like to know where my grandfather was or atleast what part of unit he was a part of but the only information my mother was able to give me is: he was a soldier, might have been in italy, might even have been in some eastern country (not poland) next, went into (insert unkown eastern countery) prisoners camp at the end of the war. If anybody could point me the direction on where to find out such things for german infantry men, i would really appreciate it. My only guess so far was, that he was rather low ranking and not necessarily in a specialized unit. He might have been part of a musical corp but that seems just as good as any guess.

for the intersted: He returend at an unkown time and lived a quite live till about 70tysomething and died when he visited us for his weekly milkrice meal in his sleep. premeal, sleep πŸ˜‰

phaidknott
Member
3898xp

There was definitely no HE rounds for the British 2 Pdr (even with the ATG gun), the only “special” you might see the Allies using was with the American 37mm Canister round however not sure if this round was used in N. Africa and probably was never issued to the British for use with the Stuart/Honey tanks.

Indeed the first “HE” AT gun the British had access to was the 75mm on the Lee/Grant tanks (and the British tankers finally had the ability to shoot at enemy ATGs with something other than MGs). Which meant that even though most other nations didn’t like the tank (particularly the Russians), the British tankers felt that the Grant was a definite “upgrade” over the usual 2 Pdr armed tanks that were being produced domestically.

Another thing to note (that Bolt Action doesn’t really cover) was that the hull MG was rather inaccurate with the gunner having to “aim” by relying on tracer/observed shot while viewing through a periscope (or with some tanks a small hole in the hull armour), they basically had no iron sights to aim down. So really the hull MG should only be useful at short ranges (but that’s just my opinion).

lawnor
Member
11963xp

Keep up the good lessons guys

uptrebor
Member
941xp

Big boy toys

skodamarine
Member
3354xp

Its always nice to learn new things.

toricova
Member
1780xp

very interesting set of videos

elessar2590
Member
10209xp

Huge fan of the Mortar.

My British Paras rely on them. MG Nest? Light Mortars. Armoured Car? light Mortars. Medium Tank? Light Mortars.

Even if you’re just pinning, taking a StuG out of a game for a turn or two is more than worth it.

My Japanese have done very well with between 6-9 Light Mortars on the table even just laying down smoke.

normandyfan
Member
900xp

Another informative video, thanks Jim

cutter
Member
579xp

Scorpions of the Desert is my favourite bit of the coverage, and this one was the best for me. I like that we get an overview that isn’t always focused on what the ruleset does.

darkdanegan
Member
9635xp

Great educational series – thanks!

collins
Member
5280xp

Has anyone consider making a list of just a support unit that’s been caught out?
For example, S company in a rifle battalion?
The British had a platoon of mortars, a platoon of machine guns, a platoon of AT and then a platoon of carrier mounted infantry all bundled into S Coy. I think it would be cool to try building one of these platoons and then show them being caught out when the German advance smashes the forward positions over running into the initial rear units. Perfect for the trench board

dukeexeter
Member
1336xp

Now I wanna make a desert table thats just like that with like only one small sand dune rising in the middle

jemmy
Member
2158xp

So much to learn, so much to dive into. Simply the best.

zorg
Member
10821xp

Nice one Guy’s.

radegast6
Member
2946xp

thank you,

georgesealy
Member
2228xp

While I love the idea of seeing 25 pounders and 88s on the table at this scale – you’re right, it just doesn’t make sense in most scenarios to see them this close to the front lines. Great video!

khy0te
Member
895xp

Know I know what hull down shielding means. “The more you know…”

woldenspoons
Member
3058xp

Big toys and support weapons is why we play.

fireblarney
Member
4229xp

Thanks again for a great little tactics series.

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