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Enemy incoming – A Blood Red Skies Project

Enemy incoming – A Blood Red Skies Project

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Project Blog by captainventanus

Recommendations: 12

About the Project

A project about occasionally painting small aircraft and letting them do their thing.

This Project is Active

Getting half a plane done

Tutoring 0
Skill 0
Idea 1
No Comments

Adapting to painting something quite this small has been a challenge has everything seems to need twice as much care. My brush skills aren’t good enough to paint these so everything needs masking off and correcting.

The mottled camo I find quite tricky. The proportion of it on the fuselage is about right to the pictures I have seen, but somehow its not quite right to make. It looked like a darker grey to me for some of the blobs, but it comes across as too dark so after this one it will be back to the normal two greys.

Getting half a plane done

On the other hand doing it without a second layer of camo looks a little too plain (?). Although some of the Me109 squadrons that flew out of Norway did use this simpler scheme. We’ll see. Next task is to order up some decals which will transform things.

Getting half a plane done

One step forward, one step sideways

Tutoring 1
Skill 1
Idea 3
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Although there will be a twist in how I approach painting the squadrons to start off with things will be fairly conventional.

For all Luftwaffe units, the Me109s and later the FW190s, it will be vaguely along the lines of mid-war Jagdgeschwader 26 as this is one of the main fighter units in the west, but elements served in most theatres. I slightly prefer the mid-war paint scheme made up of the trinity RLM 74, 75 & 76, i.e. a light grey blue, grey green and a grey violet to the early war scheme and the more muted approach to yellow.

For my historical paints these days I tend exclusively use Mig Ammo paints as the colours are good, they can be airbrushed and painted, and having learnt how to airbrush them I generally feel comfortable using them. As it happened the store I usually get my supplies from was out of the Mig Ammo sets I needed so I had to go for alternatives.

As I am not sure yet if I will airbrush or hand paint the aircraft I needed a paint that works for both methods. This rules out the Vallejo air range as in my experience the paints are quite temperamental when it comes to brush painting.

AK Interactive had a box set so I took that. The colours are fine, but for whatever reason the airbrush application was tricky on this small scale and unlike Mig Ammo paints brush application isn’t great. So I will be reverting back to what I know as soon as possible. The paints aren’t wasted though as I am toying with the idea of using the same colours for an Adeptus Titanicus force.

One step forward, one step sideways

For the Spitfires it will be the standard Temperate Land Scheme brown and green everyone is familiar with for 1940. I prefer the later grey-green scheme and that will be what I use later variants of Spitfires when they come.

Again I couldn’t get what I needed for the Sky Type S so I took a bottle of Hakata Sky Type S. Never used Hakata paints, but they make a very interesting range of realistic colours so I have wanted to try them out for a while. The paints come in different ranges – brush, airbrush and lacquer –  and the single bottle paints are supposed to be both air and brush applicable. I can’t fault the colour great, but it needs considerable thinning to be airbrushable and even then its very temperamental so its very hard to use even if there is nothing difficult about spraying the flat underside. So back to Mig Ammo as soon as I can get the colours  I need again.

So there will be a little delay as I wait for the missing paints. A gratuitous shot of progress this far.

One step forward, one step sideways

Prepare for take-off

Tutoring 2
Skill 0
Idea 4
No Comments

The numerous releases announced for Blood Red Skies back in September caught my attention and eventually led me to pick up a copy of the game. While I do know a reasonable amount about WW2 air combat its not something I really thought about gaming until now.

The rules looked quite straight forward and the advantage-disadvantage mechanic is something I wanted to try out just to see how it works out in game. While I have more than enough projects ongoing this is fairly small scale and painting such small models is something to master too.

As far as intro boxes go this Blood Red Skies is pretty good and works nicely just as a board game and you wouldn’t need to take

 

Prepare for take-off

Out of the box the models come in two different colours so you are good to go, but I primed them right away. Light grey because being small the colours need to be a little bit brighter than I would normal paint.

They do need a little bit of clean up with some careful knife work. Nothing major and you have to bare in mind its plastic and small so somewhere there has to be a mould line. Unless you go for very light, white paint schemes it won’t matter than much.

The bendy wings are often mentioned. Yes some of them are, again its no big deal for game pieces like this that are going to be knocked about eventually anyway.

On word of warning though, you can bend them back into shape with a little warm water. But its very soft plastic and even water from very warm taps will make it go very bendy very quickly. I haven’t seen something as flexible as this since Forgeworld resin. Just take a bit of care.

Prepare for take-off

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