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tidewater Darkstar

tidewater Darkstar

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Project Blog by charpentierDerosia

Recommendations: 16

About the Project

After expressing interest upon the discovery of the famous Let's Play episode, getting posts from the creator for new ships, acquiring a felt hex-mat, and realizing that our Battlefleet Gothic's smallest ships... were too big, it sadly stayed unplayed. Then at the end of 2020, I finally took another serious look at laying down ships and cutting counters for craft. At first, we paid no money. Everything we used in game #1, from tiny 4-5mm dice for torpedoes, fighters, bombers, & others, to the stands made from small paperclips, to the plastic parts used for conversion ship models was already in hand. Well, we needed sleeves for dry-erase marking of damage on WRS's. And later alphabet & number beads for better counters. And Lego to build a crude starmap model (to correct misperception of distances). But we were blundering our way into Darkstar, and learning from our mistakes. Mainly misreading or missing rules, sometimes missing out on sound judgement. I can't promise frequent posts, but hopefully the activity level will not appear dead to any who find these words and images...

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Capsized captured (smaller than a cap, and not crippled)

Tutoring 1
Skill 1
Idea 2
No Comments

In the 1st entry, that last image was basically… Not An Image. So here is a better look at what I meant by INVERSION (tm?):

Smallest ships at the bottom, from Corvette, Frigate, Destroyer, and Light Cruiser, all shown rolled over to flip port & starboard sides.  Hopefully now you can see green and red lights painted on, with wire bases attachment through the stern.  The bottom one was supposed to be a Frigate, but maybe it's closer to Corvette size? Smallest ships at the bottom, from Corvette, Frigate, Destroyer, and Light Cruiser, all shown rolled over to flip port & starboard sides. Hopefully now you can see green and red lights painted on, with wire bases attachment through the stern. The bottom one was supposed to be a Frigate, but maybe it's closer to Corvette size?

Les Pieces Des Resistance

Tutoring 4
Skill 4
Idea 4
7 Comments

To begin, I figured showing this first would be the most valuable to any who see this.  Which is one way of making counters and ships for this game:

Card or cardboard or cardstock counters cut from old… sprues? frames? that came from various boardgames (& some boxed wargames) we’re what I was hoping to use, but then I tried the first flimsy wedges on my natty felt hex-mat, and that was a deadend. (Fine for any other smooth or solid surface maybe)

So, after hemming and hawing about buying beads (?!), I bought up a handful of randomly assorted letter and number cubes with cylinder shaped channels for cording.  I’m hoping to find a foam-wrapped wire later, but some small “pipe-cleaners” cut to tiny lengths are serviceable for now

Ships were made from plastic parts, some inverted from normal orientation to hide their origins better.  Also, because the rules featured INVERSION(tm), & I had remembered some Star Wars X-Wing models (e.g. the B-Wing)  being attached from the rear/engine area, I knew I wanted basing to connect to the stern.  Everything I looked at making was too complicated.  For example, if I made a base that could comfortably & securely hold 3 ships, you would have to pluck a ship out Everytime you moved -1 ship at a time because of initiative- or atleast everytime they separated.  So I was about to give up when I looked at my tiny drill bits and some tiny paperclips that had a coat of sorts (like sheathing for a wire).  To make each base, the “trombone” inner loop was carefully extended up at an angle to one end, stripped off about a 1/4-inch, then bent from there to point level & “forward” to make the mounting pin.  Tiny red/green ship lights were painted on the underside in an order that would clue an observer that not only was the “belly up”, but that starboard (green) & port (red) were reversed.

The 'code' of the markings/colors is letter first for type, then number.  Numbers are always black over white; craft are neon color letter over black (fewer colors, but more of each letter).  All ordnance (torpedoes, missiles) are black letters over various colored backgrounds, more colors to tell launching ships apart. The 'code' of the markings/colors is letter first for type, then number. Numbers are always black over white; craft are neon color letter over black (fewer colors, but more of each letter). All ordnance (torpedoes, missiles) are black letters over various colored backgrounds, more colors to tell launching ships apart.

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