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Osbad’s got gas(lands)

Osbad’s got gas(lands)

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Project Blog by osbad

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About the Project

Gaslands cars, terrain and gubbins. An adventure in recovering my lost childhood by playing with Hotwheels and Matchbox cars whilst pretending I am a serious gamer.

This Project is Active

Swamp Buggy

Tutoring 2
Skill 3
Idea 3
1 Comment

This one is pretty stock.  The bodywork was a “matt” rather than shiny, so would take weathering well, and I didn’t really want to spoil the profile with too many weapons.  So I just took out some of the windows, gave the interior a simple paint job and a driver and armed passenger riding shotgun.  I did add an old “Gar” head from Beyond the Gates of Antares onto the front bumper as this could be an energy weapon of some kind, a counts-as machine gun or a flamethrower or something.

'32 Ford

Tutoring 3
Skill 3
Idea 3
No Comments

The next car to cover is a splendid little Ford hot rod.  I really couldn’t decided on a paint scheme for this so I went “rat”.  I may repaint it brighter in future, but right now this works for me.  I went minimalist on the weapon – just a Ramshackle Games forward facing machine gun.  See if you can spot it!

Chevelle Station Wagon

Tutoring 2
Skill 2
Idea 2
No Comments

I think I’ve covered pretty much most of the bases, so rather than going into the next builds in depth I think I’ll just post them as galleries with limited summary comments.

First up is a Chevelle Station Wagon (or “estate car” as we would call it on this side of the pond).

This one I wanted to remove the glass and replace it with metal mesh.  During the process of putting the model back together again I decided that the lowrider suspension gave the model an over-loaded look, so I departed from my usual approach of making cars that had the vibe of being specially designed for televised combat-racing in a post-apocalyptic world, I went for a more “survivalist” vibe.  I think it worked OK.

As far as I can identify the bitz used are a Ramshackle Games gunner, who is in a turret from a 1/72 Sherman tank, a turret from a 1/72 Panzer IV or Tiger (can’t remember which) with a 1/72 Ma Deuce 30 Cal. machine gun.  The box in the back window are from a Team Yankee (1/100 scale) Scimitar tank, the jerry can is also from Battlefront in the same scale.  The bedroll on the roof… who knows.  It was just in the bitz box!  There is also a cable on the rear bumper from another long forgotten 1/72 tank kit, as is the cut down schirtzen, re-used as extra armour for the rear windows.

And one final thing.  Those wondering where I sourced the mesh from – I bought a “spatter guard” from the kitchenware department of a local store.  It cost around £2 for a 12″ radius disk of mesh.

Monster Truck

Tutoring 1
Skill 2
Idea 2
No Comments

Now, this was a quandry.  I had always fancied a Monster Truck for Gaslands as the rules are awesome (You get to drive over stuff!! What’s not to like?!), so when I found one in my local branch of Asda I snapped it up, notwithstanding its price of a whole £7!  (Imagine that? £7 for a single model!  I ask you!)

I may be being slightly sarcastic in that last comment, but really the price of Hotwheels at around £1 a time is spoiling me, and doing havoc with my sense of perspective.  I had started thinking £20 for a single model wasn’t too bad, but I am cured of that, at least for now!

Anyhow, the quandry came from the fact that the model was pretty much ready to use straight out of the packet.  I wasn’t planning on adding much in the way of weaponry, and it came with an ace paint job on the body.  And I didn’t want to feth up the model by damaging it.

Well, I eventually plucked up the courage.  Afterall, this is post-apocalypse gaming, so if I damaged the bodywork, who’s to say it wasn’t deliberate?

Which was when my first problem arose.  Unlike normal hotwheels cars, the body shell was attached with a screw not a rivet.  So far so good.  However the screw had a triangular slot, not a philips head.  Boo!  So I ordered a triangular screwdriver off ebay for £1.  Hooray!   But it had to come from China and took a fortnight! Boo!  And when it arrived it was too large for the screw!

£$*&!!#!

So out came the drill, and normal service was eventually resumed.

So it broke down into three parts.  The body shell, the frame and the wheels and chassis.  The body was left untouched – it had a nice matt finish and a great decal, so I didn’t want to do anything but a bit of weathering and pick out some details, so that could wait until reassembly.

Do you like my body?Do you like my body?

Next was the framework.  This looked really cool but came in a shiny black plastic.  So I sprayed it with Army Painter Chaos Red, which is a default I have for oxidised steel.

Monster Truck

I then picked out some of the detail.

Monster Truck

Next, the chassis and wheel hubs were sprayed with Chaos Red to hide the chrome.  I did try using bleach to remove the chrome effect, but it only partially worked, and the plastic was still very shiny, so out came the spray.

I repainted the tyres black then reattached the frame.  I also added a driver, but you really can’t see him unless you peer hard!

I then stuck the body back in place.

The final stage was some subtle weathering and highlighting (the obligatory wash of dilute Nuln Oil, and also picking out the radiator and some body damage.  Then adding a pair of machine guns to the front of the chassis and a canister to represent an oil/caltrop/glue dropper at the back.

Going the whole hog, part the second

Tutoring 4
Skill 5
Idea 1
No Comments

So next for attention was the “chassis”.  This was a shiney chrome, which obviously isn’t “post apocalyptic” enough really and is probably one of the most “toy-like” and least “model-like” element of the vehicle, so needed some attention.

It is usually possible to remove the chrome effect by soaking the part in bleach for a while.  I have tried this and it works, but bleach is nasty stuff as it smells and can easily cause damage to clothes and fingers, so I tend to avoid it personally.  But YMMV.  Incidentally the paintstripper I use is relatively benign.  I use plastic gloves, but that is really just a precaution, as it hasn’t caused any irritation on my skin when I have touched it, and it dries up to a very faint inert residue if left to dry.

Anyhoo, for this chassis, all I did was glue the wheels in place and then spray it with matt black undercoat.

Going the whole hog, part the second

The next part was the internal cockpit.  This was sprayed matt black (it was originally a shiney black plastic), the steering wheel snipped off, and a Ramshackle Games driver inserted.  Ramshackle Games models are in a very high relief casting, so they take paint very well.  A quick base coat and a wash with Nuln Oil, wiping off the excess, brought out the detail very well at this scale.

As you can see, I sprayed the body shell matt black, and then reassembled with a couple of dabs of superglue.

Sam and Dean are going to want their car backSam and Dean are going to want their car back

The final thing was to add a weapon.  Went for a gatling gun.  It seemed appropriate and to fit the style of the car well.  I used a Ramshackle Games one with a couple of added bits – some handle gubbins from some old 40k kit, and an ammo box from some old 1:72 WWII model kit.  Don’t ask me which.

Final stage was to add decals and weathering/highlighting.  I went for a rusty metal look.  Pretty easy to pull off and minimal work.  What you can’t see from the photo is that I highlighted the grill and picked out the head and tail lights.  All pretty simple stuff.

Going the whole hog

Tutoring 4
Skill 1
Idea 3
No Comments

Time for another post, this time with MOAR FOTOS!

I picked up a Hotwheels Dodge Charger from my local Poundland that was just aching for repurposing, so here we go.

First off I dismantled the car, which involved drilling out two rivets from below.  I use a hand drill as it is a very controlled way of drilling and sometimes the metal these cars are made of is a bit fragile and can shatter under the pressure of drilling if you go too vigorously at it.  Also I can never seem to remember to charge my electric drill up before I need to use it…

So, having dismantled the car, it is time for stripping.  I’ll avoid the predictable awkward humour potential here.  But “stripping”… *sniggers*…

What I use is a bottle of the cheapest paintstripper I could find in my local discount hardware store.  This is it.

Going the whole hog

Squirting a generous helping over my car body I left it in an old takeaway carton with a lid for a few hours.  May even have been overnight.
Here’s the “before”:

Going the whole hog

And here’s the “after”:

Going the whole hog

A quick scrub with a brass bristled brush (try saying that after a couple of pints!) later and we have a clean body shell.

Going the whole hog

Now, as you can see from some of the previous posts in this PLOG, I don’t always dismantle and strip models.  A lot of the time I don’t think it worth the effort.  But this time I definitely didn’t want any bright yellow paint showing through and I also wanted to remove the windows.  So I thought it was worth it.

Talking of which, it was now time to address the other bits (well, really I did a lot of this while the stripper was taking effect, but for the sake of a coherent narrative forgive the temporal distortion and just run with it!)

The other bitsThe other bits

The first thing to do was to clip off the unwanted back part of the glazing piece as I only wanted to keep the windscreen

Going the whole hog

The van's the man

Tutoring 1
Skill 1
Idea 4
1 Comment
Swag from AsdaSwag from Asda

Well, after scoring a couple of hits in Poundland, I decided to swing by the toys aisle in my local Asda while out grocery shopping.  Yes, hunting out minis while doing the shopping is now a thing in my life!  Suddenly chores seem less boring!

And I lucked out.  I found a Hotwheels Monster Truck and a couple of other vehicles with promise, as you can see in the photo above.

The first I decided to work on was the “SWAT Van” in the middle.

Grey van with a big and inexplicably blue Grey van with a big and inexplicably blue "X-ray" arm

Getting it out of its packaging it had a strange big blue arm thing on it that seemed pretty silly (yeah, I know, but run with me!) so I took that off and was left with something pretty mean and aggressive to start with.

Big placcy vanBig placcy van

The interesting thing about this particular toy was that it was entirely made of plastic.  No die-cast metal body, as is usual with hotwheels.  This meant that there was no point stripping it as it was pre-coloured plastic, not painted metal.  Also the windows were already black, so there was no problem with painting them as no details would be lost.

So this would make for one easy paint job!

However first I added some gubbins – a missile system and also a hatch cover (to block the hole left from removing the blue arm) both from Team Yankee.  And a  “30 Cal”, a tank exhaust system, a kit box and a “Cullen Cutter” from Flames of War completed the “mean machine” look I was going for.

Once the bitz were glued on, then a simple spritz with matt black undercoat.

I added some random 40k transfers for interest and added meanness, dry brushed lightly with grey to pick out the highlights.  A spray of matt varnish and then brush on gloss varnish for the windows, and I called it done.

Getting all technical

Tutoring 3
Skill 4
Idea 4
No Comments

So, encouraged by the bus, I started looking around cheap shops for what else I could gussy up for Gaslands.  I popped into a different, larger, branch of Poundland on my way home from work and found they had a slightly larger range of toy cars on offer, including a wonderful 1950’s style pickup that was crying out to be taken home and given some love.

Toy car in the wildToy car in the wild

Now, having joined the Gaslands Facebook group (which has got to be one of THE most active wargaming FB groups out there!  It is phenomenal!) I found that a lot of folks were stripping the car bodies before repainting them as the original paint used is rather thick (after all it does have to cope with a lot of abuse from little boys and girls!!) and obscures detail.  I wasn’t really that bothered myself but I thought I’d give it a go for experimental purposes, so along with the car I bought some cheap paintstripping gel.

After popping the rivets, removing the innards, slathering the shell with the gel, leaving it overnight and then giving it a quick brush up with a wire brush, this is the result.

Getting all technical

It wasn’t much hassle and did give a blank canvas to work from, so I guess its probably worth it.  Depends how much you want to change the model I suppose.  This model was in brown (I hate brown!) so I was happy to lose the colour.  However, if I was happy with the base colour I probably wouldn’t bother with this step in future, and just run with the existing one and weather it.  Of course, painting over the colour with another is also an option as I did with the Warbus.  Each has their merits and drawbacks.  The great thing with Post Apocalypse gaming is that it doesn’t matter as the grungier the paintjob the better! Wheeeee! Artistic Licence!!

Having removed the innards I gave them a basic paint job, and ended up with this:

Getting all technical

So, I sprayed the body matt black, re-assembled the model and decided to add a bit of plasticard “armour” over the windshield area, a Ramshackle Games turret gunner in the bed and leave it at that.  Drybrushing and weathering, and the obligatory Nuln Oil wash and a spritz of matt varnish completed the job.

Ladies and gentlemen, I give you “The Hillbilly Technical”!

Throwing the project under the bus

Tutoring 1
Skill 5
Idea 5
No Comments

Well, suitably impressed with the game I decided it was worth investing the time and effort into some more vehicles.  Of course, one would have thought that maybe moving onto a more elaborate paint job or something would be logical, but this is GASLANDS baby!  I was struck by inspiration while perusing my local Wilko’s for toy cars and bought this bad boy!

Yes, a Routemaster bus.  I didn’t know what I wanted to do with it, but I knew that I wanted it in my life!

So, I drilled out the rivets holding it together, took out the glass and dismantled the whole thing.  The seats got sprayed black, the shell got sprayed Army Painter Chaos Red, as did the chassis.
Before re-assembly I inserted a driver using a spare Team Yankee tank commander and then glued it back together.

I created some “metal sheet” for some of the windows out of plastic sheet (I used an old “DVD case” figures box from Mantic), stuck an extra exhaust from a 15mm WWII Panther, inserted a spare 15mm main gun from a Stug in the front window beside the driver.

I then created a ram from plastic card and stuck it on the front.  Because plough-bus!  Subsequently, I reread the rules and found you can’t have a ram AND a cannon on the same bus because there aren’t enough build points, so the ram came back off again after the photos were taken.

I painted up the “bits” with a terracotta.

The whole thing was then washed with Nuln Oil and then the red was wetbrushed with a dark red.  The applique bitz were drybrushed them lightly with dark silver and stippled some orange.

Warbus baby!

More work on the first cars

Tutoring 7
Skill 9
Idea 8
No Comments

That initial spritz of matt varnish wasn’t really enough – the cars looked still rather glossy, but I didn’t really have time for a proper full on paint job (I only really had about 4 hours of working time available before the game) so I decided I did really need to run with the colours I had and just do the minimum of painting.

So I hit them again with the matt spray and then brush undercoated the bitz  My final touch was some basic weathering.  A careful wash with Nuln Oil – well in reality a better description would be a messy pinwash as I wasn’t really that careful – but just tried to focus in the panel lines and bare metal.  The rest of the “weathering” was pretty quick streaky paint just to make them look more interesting.  The guy in the turret on the pickup was basecoated and given a Nuln Oil wash too.  The last touch was to paint some white number panels and put identification numbers on them using some spare old transfers.
A final touch was to gloss varnish the “windows” which were an opaque black plastic.

I did end up base coating the buggy in black as I had to cover up the “Guardians of the Galaxy” transfers on it and this was the quickest way!

The bitz I used were:

Orange car:

1/100 scale “Ma Deuce” heavy machine gun from a Flames of War plastic tank kit.

The extra front bumper was a piece of random sprue.
The window armour was a piece of “plasticard”, well, really a piece of chopped up DVD case, but sheet plastic is sheet plastic at the end of the day!

Pickup:

1/100 scale Cullen Cutter from a Flames of War Sherman Tank kit.

Turret, machine gun and commander from a Team Yankee British kit, I think the FV432, but I am not sure now.

Random piece of plastic to break up the silhouette on the back of the cab.

Extra exhaust pipes on the cab door was a redundant Battlefront 1/100 WWII Panther exhaust.

Blue car:

Twin guns from Gates of Antares Concorde kit.  Not sure which – possibly jet bikes.

Purple car:

Machine gun from Gates of Antares Concorde kit.  Again possibly their jet bikes.

Rear oil dropper – I have no clue where that came from – possibly a WWII tank exhaust?

Buggy:

The gun is a minigun that I think came from a Eureka Miniatures kit from their Pax Limpopo range.  It has been in my bitz box a looooooooong time!

There is also a Tau arial on the rear of the cab, for interest.

The side window covers are the hatches from a Team Yankee FV432 I think, or maybe a Spartan.

Oh, yes, and the game.  It was huge fun.  Massively enjoyable, so much so that the next day I went down the street again at lunchtime and splurged on some more toys!

Total painting and prep time maybe 6 hours over 2 nights.

My first cars

Tutoring 0
Skill 0
Idea 6
1 Comment

My first foray

I work in a small market town with a slowly dying (aren’t they all!) high street, so the opportunities for scoring 1/64th scale cars for this game were not looking promising.  However, I decided to try out Poundland first, and scored!  I wasn’t sure at this point whether I would really like the game or not as my rulebook hadn’t arrived at the time and I only had a couple of days to quickly do something before my first game was due.  Fortunately Poundland (or “The Land of Quid” as my wife and I fondly know it – courtesy of Birds of a Feather…) had some cheap offerings to get me started – an own brand range priced 2 for a pound that were basic, but looked pretty serviceable.  I also found a promising looking car from the proper Hotwheels brand for a whole pound.  So 3 quid and I was already set up with 5 miniatures!  I like those numbers!

Getting them home, gluing a few spare machine guns from my bitz boxes on them and then spraying with Army Painter matt spray, and this is what they looked like.

All shiney and newAll shiney and new

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