Skip to toolbar

Atlas of Hillforts

Home Forums News, Rumours & General Discussion Atlas of Hillforts

Supported by (Turn Off)

This topic contains 10 replies, has 8 voices, and was last updated by  dawfydd 1 month ago.

Viewing 11 posts - 1 through 11 (of 11 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #1435673

    dawfydd
    Participant
    4687xp

    Okay so this is some very interesting news, for those interested in history, terrain, myth & folklore: The University of Oxford have published online an interactive Atlas of all 4,147 known hillforts across Britain & Ireland.

    http://www.ox.ac.uk/news/2017-06-23-online-hillforts-atlas-maps-all-4147-britain-and-ireland-first-time?fbclid=IwAR0RKY9gPSVhu2NU88JrE61ig351QiKuT098xiH6LNjFULSpTp1e5mgZFmc#

    https://hillforts.arch.ox.ac.uk/

    Now this gets my juices flowing as hillforts were kind of my thing at university when I studied Archaeology, and more specifically the fort of Foel Drygarn in Pembrokeshire, that is just fascinating what with being built in a supremely defensible position around a trio of Bronze Age stone cairns, within meters of a source of fresh water and where the ramparts would have controlled the visual access to the cairns by folks in the surrounding landscapes (also, at the foot of the hill there is evidence of a small temporary Irish settlement dated to the early 1st century if memory serves).
    And wouldn’t you know it, the Atlas brought it straight up:
    Capture1

    Even dug out some of the pictures there I took back in 2002. To have had a modern camera phone for a panoramic view back then…..
    Trigarn Cairns

    #1435679

    robert
    Participant
    12561xp

    Couple of those are quite close to me.  Might have to get the walking shoes on and brave the local farmers some day.

    #1435683

    torros
    Participant
    12768xp

    (In the voice of Ben) Very cool

    • This reply was modified 1 month ago by  torros.
    #1435690

    somegeezer
    Participant
    6090xp

    This is truly excellent. I have a fond memory of flying into Edinburgh over the hills and being able to see the outlines of hill forts in the snow.

    #1435695

    templar007
    Participant
    4603xp

    Thanks for sharing that @dawfydd

     

    I have often turned to  Archeological Papers published and available for free, (through the power of the internet), for the basis of terrain builds for tables.  Of course I remember spending many hours, (or days), in libraries “Before the time of the Internet”.

     

    Lots of good stuff out there to inspire folks, if they just take advantage of others hard work!  Big thanks to the ‘Dirt Nerds’.  👍😎

    #1435790

    nogbadthebad
    Participant
    2929xp

    Am I the only one who thinks there is a drinking game to be had with the weekender, every time Ben says ”cool” take a drink…

    #1435843

    dawfydd
    Participant
    4687xp

    @nogbadthebad no, because we all value our livers and longterm good health far too much…..

    #1435985

    nogbadthebad
    Participant
    2929xp

    😂

    #1435992

    avernos
    Keymaster
    13691xp

    cheers matey, I’m book marking that.

    #1436045

    bigdave
    Participant
    2068xp

    Top stuff! So many avenues to follow with a resource like this – and for Saga players wanting to do a campaign, quite a number of hill forts would be reoccupied under King Alfred. Some would be refortified, others would feature prominently in some of the battles against the Danes. On a smaller scale, being able to utilise your knowledge of the locations of different hill forts as a raiding/counter raiding force could be invaluable. The ability to camp overnight behind the safety of a ditch could increase depth of your raids into enemy territory as a Welsh or Viking raider, or for some poor Saxon fyrdsman provide a rallying point to gather local forces when you try to catch them (and their loot) as they try and make it back home again…

    Their utility lasted right the way up to the Napoleonic era, volunteer infantry units on the south coast of England made use of them during the invasion scares as encampments, the strategic locations of some of them not diminishing 2000 years on. An invading French column having to march up the slope towards the ditches and ramparts of an old Hill Fort with musket fire raining down on them? Or worse, trying to bypass them on a forced march to the military canal and then London? Ready-made guerrilla nests in the hills of Southern England.

    Great find man, going to spend ages pawing my way through this now…

    #1436069

    dawfydd
    Participant
    4687xp

    @avernos & @bigdave glad to be of service 🙂

Viewing 11 posts - 1 through 11 (of 11 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

Supported by (Turn Off)