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The Millennium Falcon

The Millennium Falcon

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Wires and Texture

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To simulate the Millenium Falcon’s knotted tangle.of wiring, I carefully glue in place actual wire. I use a 2 m telephone extention I would have never used again in this wireless age (It is very flexible, and has a flat side, so easy to glue in place). I wanted a real tangle in the engine room and the 2 triangular work I be areas at the front of the ship, but I don’t want actual loops that will snag on things and get torn off. I also want figures to be able to enter these areas, so my solution is to glue the tangled wiring to the floor, so miniatures can walk on top of the wiring (probably having to make an electrocution saving throw unless they are Han, Cheque and maybe Rey).

When the telephone extention run out, I used the inner wiring from some heavy 30amp wire offcuts an electrician left at my house. As a bonus, I realised that the grey wire sleeving could be used to make those iconic cushion pads that the Falcon has on its corridors. I also use it to make pillows for the bed and the seating area, to add some consistency to the different parts of the ship.

 

To get rid of any areas of large grey card before painting the insides, I cover the grey card walls with a bobbly clear plastic sheeting I found from somewhere – I guess it is intended to add grip to car dashboards. It probably doesn’t show up to great in the photos, being clear, but I am hoping it will give the walls a patterned metal look when primed and drybrushed. (I leave the floors as plain card, as I have something else planned for those later.)

Texturing finally done.... Now the insides of the ship are ready to paint.Texturing finally done.... Now the insides of the ship are ready to paint.

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