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Sprue Goo

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This topic contains 4 replies, has 2 voices, and was last updated by  alfonsothetraitor 4 weeks, 1 day ago.

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  • #1871785

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    Apply the Sprue Goo to the seam you want to hide. You want to apply only enough Sprue Goo to hide the seam. Now take your liquid cement and thin out the edge and thin out the area of the slurry. You made need to take a couple of passes. Allow this to sit for 30seconds and take a look if you are happy with the results move on to the next seam. If not use more Sprue Goo if needed but if you think you have too much Sprue Goo use your liquid cement and remove it.
    You may need to practice this a couple of times before you get it right. After it cures you can always sand down any excess Sprue Goo you may find.

    #1871898

    jamescutts
    6839xp
    Cult of Games Member

    Great little hobby tip!

    I also find if the gap is small enough just running some liquid cement over it might sort it out.

    #1872035

    @jamescutts

    I totally agree!

    also liquid cement is great at removing small mold lines too.

    #1874385

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    #1874386

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