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Broadsword Calling Danny Boy, Broadsword Calling Danny Boy

Broadsword Calling Danny Boy, Broadsword Calling Danny Boy

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Project Blog by panzerkaput Cult of Games Member

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About the Project

02 Hundred Hours is a skirmish wargame focusing on night-time raids in World War II. Inspired by classic war movies as well as historical events, battles are fast paced with roughly 10-20 models on either side. Field an elite force of Commandos, SAS, Paratroopers or Rangers to infiltrate the enemy lines under cover of darkness. Recruit SOE spies and local resistance fighters to bolster your chances. Launch attacks on radar stations, munition factories, airfields, bridges and rail lines. Sneak past sentries, take them out with silent attacks, or open fire with a devastating ambush. Plant charges to destroy your objective, assassinate a target or grab vital intel, then fight your way to safety before reinforcements arrive. Or play as the defenders, carefully setting patrol routes so your sentries can spot raiders in the shadows, utilise guard dogs, officers or even the dreaded Gestapo and make use of informants and intercepted transmissions to thwart the attackers’ plans.

This Project is Active

Battledress and Helmets Done

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Battledress and Helmets Done

I have painted the Khaki Battledress and the Bronze Green helmets, scarves and wooden hats for my British SAS for 02 Hundred Hours from Grey for Now Games. They are starting to take shape and the next stage is the Denison Smock for them.

The battledress recipe is:

The based battledress with Vallejo Model Colour Burnt Umber, highlighted with VMC English Uniform, and added further highlights of VMC Khaki Grey.

Then I added a wash of VMC Burnt Umber watered down the mix with 3 parts water.

Colours used the battledress

Vallejo Model Colour Burnt Umber

Vallejo Model Colour English Uniform

Vallejo Model Colour Khaki

 

The Bronze Green recipe is:

The base skin with Vallejo Model Colour German Extra Dark Green, highlighted with VMC Bronze Green, and added further highlights of VMC Camo Olive Green/Russian Green and a final highlight of VMC Camo Olive Green/Russian Green and VMC Ivory at three part Russian Green and one part Ivory.

Colours used

Vallejo Model Colour German Extra Dark Green

Vallejo Model Colour Bronze Green

Vallejo Model Colour Camo Olive Green/Russian Green

Vallejo Model Colour Ivory

Starting the British SAS

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British SASBritish SAS

I have started my 02 Hundred Hours journey and I have started with painting the British SAS raiders first. I’ve been painting about with my skin recipe; it’s worked but I think it need a little refining.

The skin tone recipe is:

The base skin with Vallejo Model Colour Tan Earth, highlighted with VMC Tan Yellow, and added further highlights of VMC Iraqui Sand and Basic Flesh.

Then I added a wash of Army paint Strong Tone and VMC Transparent Red is a 2 to 1 mix of Strong Tone to Red and watered down the mix with 3 parts water.

Then I highlighted it again with VMC Tan Yellow and Iraqui Sand.

Colours used

Vallejo Model Colour Tan Earth

Vallejo Model Colour Tan Yellow

Vallejo Model Colour Iraqui Sand

Vallejo Model Colour Basic Flesh

Vallejo Model Colour Red Transparent

Army Painter Strong Tone

 

Next to paint the battledress.

#wargamesatlantic #greyfornowgames #02hundredhours #historicalgamer #wargamer

And Now It Starts, Operation Spamalot

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Primed and Ready to GoPrimed and Ready to Go

I have assembled and primed all the plastics from the Starter Box for both the German Heer and British SAS, 18 for the Gerry and 12 for the Brits, plus 4 French resistance/SOE Agents. I have also assembled and primed the characters for the expansion set, Guards of Facility 9.

I am going to start painting the British SAS first and once there are finished paint Gerry. I realised that I have a ton of scenery for Very British Civil War that might be of use for this so am I going to dig them out and see.

Colour Guide – German Infantry

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German Infantry, Germans in Greatcoats, Late War Germans

Item Colour Vallejo Model Colour
Helmet Dark Grey German Dk Grey 70.995,
Uniform Field Grey German Field Grey WW2 70.830
Uniform (variant early war) Reed Green German Uniform 70.920
Greatcoat Field Grey German Field Grey WW2 70.830
Webbing Black Black 70.950
Bread Bag, Shovel Cover Khaki Green Russian Uniform 70.924
Gasmask Tin, Canteen Dark Green German Dark Green 70.896
Canteen (late war) Khaki Yellow Desert Yellow 70.977
Water bottle Cover Brown German Camo Red Brown 70.826, Flat Brown 70.984
Water bottle Lid & strap Black Black 70.950
Anklets / Gaiters Dark Green German Dark Green 70.896
Boots Black Black 70.950

Introduction
This guide will help you to quickly paint units of soldiers to look good on a war games table. Uniform notes, paint references and painting tips are included.

Historical Notes
Uniform
Uniforms were produced in field grey (Feldgrau) but the colour changed during the war years. At the start, it was a dark grey with a blue green tone. Towards the end of the war, cloth supplies were limited so many variations ranging from mid grey to brownish grey were used. Late war variations can
be made by mixing grey or brown to the standard shade.

Vehicles in the early war period were grey. From 1943 onwards, new vehicles were painted in yellow ochre. Camouflage was added using red brown and dark green. Metal items such as heavy weapons, ammunition boxes and mess tins were grey in the early period and ochre in the late period. However, even towards the end of the war, grey items were still common.

Bread bags and anklets were produced in field grey but being cotton faded rapidly. Water bottles had a black painted aluminium cup which served as the lid and a brown wool cover.

Squad Organisation and Equipment
Insignia
German army soldiers wore Heer symbols on the collar. In the early war period, this went on a dark green patch but later, it was onto grey fabric. These can be simulated by painting a small white = symbol on the collar.

On the left breast the eagle symbol was worn. This can be painted in white or light grey. The same was often on the front of cloth caps.

Shoulder boards were black with coloured piping on the edge
Artillerie (artillery) – Red
Aufklärungs (reconnaissance) – Yellow
Feldgendarmerie (field police) – Orange
Infanterie (infantry) – White
Jäger/Gebirgsjäger (light infantry/mountaineer) – Light Green
Panzergrenadier (armored/motorized infantry) – Dark Green
Pionier (engineer) – Black
Sanitäter/Artz (medic/doctor) – Cornflower Blue
Panzerjäger (tank destroyer) -Pink
Panzer (black wool center w/pink piping; same as SS).

Colour Guide – British Airborne/SAS

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British Airborne, SAS Europe

Item Colour Vallejo Model Colour
Beret Airborne Maroon Dark Red 70.946
Helmet Dark Green Russian Green 70.894, Bronze Green 70.897
The airborne scarf was camouflaged in brown and green.
Scarf Dark Green Russian Green 70.894, Bronze Green 70.897
Scarf Brown Mahogany Brown 70.846, Flat Brown 70.984
The Denison Smock was camouflaged with blotches of brown, black and green on a pale coloured background.
Base Beige German Camo Beige 70.821
Base (option) Pale Green Pastel Green 70.885
Camouflage Brown Mahogany Brown 70.846, Flat Brown 70.984
Camouflage Dark Green Russian Green 70.894, Bronze Green 70.897
Camouflage Black Black 70.950
Uniform Khaki US Field Drab 70.973, English Uniform 70.921, Flat Earth 70.983
Webbing & Pouches Beige German Camo Beige 70.821
Anklets / Gaiters Sand Iraqi Sand 70.819, Dark Sand 70.847
Boots – Soldiers Black Black 70.950

Notes
British uniforms were consistent over all branches of the army. Commandos, infantry, artillery and many Commonwealth forces engaged in Europe had only slight variations of insignia and beret.

Airborne forces were similar but with the addition of a camouflaged Denison smock jacket. A few specialists’ units also received camouflaged trousers.
Khaki cloth was mostly a brown shade and relatively colourfast. Vallejo English uniform 70.921 is very dark and brown, Flat Earth 70.984 or US Field Drab 70.973 are lighter tones. Canadian produced cloth was slightly greener in tone.

Webbing, anklets and ammunition pouches were issued in Sand and Green shades. They were made from were cotton canvas and faded rapidly. In theory, green is correct for the late war period in Europe, but soldiers were issued with both colours. Green ammunition pouches were sometimes worn with sand
coloured webbing and vice versa.

British made vehicles and metal items were dark green (Reflective Green). American made vehicles were olive green drab (US Dark Green 70.893).

Further Reading
Books
General
Andrew Mollo: The Armed Forces of World War 2 (Little, Brown and Company)
This book is a very useful overview of uniforms and insignia. There are 250 colour drawings and 100 photographs which cover every nation involved in WW2. The original 1981 version is a large format book. There is an A5 reprint that does not include the Eastern front.
Chris McNab: 20th Century Military Uniforms: 300 Uniforms from Around the World (Grange Books PLC)
This book is similar in style to Andrew Mollo’s book and has many of the same illustrations.
Osprey books are also very good but there are several which touch the subject, so it is difficult to recommend one item.
Britain
Martin Brayley: The World War II Tommy: British Army Uniforms European Theatre 1939-45 (The Crowood Press Ltd)
A very useful book with colour photographs showing original uniforms and equipment.
Jean Bouchery: 1944-45 British Soldier: From D-Day to V-Day: Pt. 1 (Histoire & Collections)
Jean Bouchery: 1944-45 British Soldier: From D-Day to V-Day: Pt. 2 (Histoire & Collections)
Taken together these two books are very comprehensive. Part 1 covers uniforms. Part 2 covers vehicles and weapons. Both are illustrated with diagrams and colour photographs showing original uniforms and equipment

Colour Guide – British Commandos

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Commandos – North West Europe (Normandy, etc)

Item Colour Vallejo Model Colour
Beret Commando Green Deep Green 70.970
Helmet Dark Green Russian Green 70.894, Bronze Green 70.897
Helmet Cover Khaki Green Russian Uniform 70.924
Leather Jerkin Brown Mahogany Brown 70.846, Flat Brown 70.984
Uniform Khaki US Field Drab 70.973, English Uniform 70.921, Flat Earth 70.983
Backpack Khaki Green Russian Uniform 70.924
Backpack straps Beige German Camo Beige 70.821
Webbing & Pouches Sand Iraqi Sand 70.819, Dark Sand 70.847
Webbing (variant) Beige German Camo Beige 70.821
Webbing (variant) Pale Green Deck Tan 70.912, Pastel Green 70.885
Anklets / Gaiters Beige German Camo Beige 70.821
Boots – Soldiers Black Black 70.950

Notes
British uniforms were consistent over all branches of the army. Commandos, infantry, artillery and many Commonwealth forces engaged in Europe had only slight variations of insignia and beret. A few specialists’ units also received camouflaged jackets and trousers.

Khaki cloth was mostly a brown shade and relatively colourfast. Vallejo English uniform 70.921 is very dark and brown, Flat Earth 70.984 or US Field Drab 70.973 are lighter tones.

Webbing, anklets and ammunition pouches were issued in Sand and Green shades. They were made from were cotton canvas and faded rapidly. In theory, green is correct for the late war period in Europe, but soldiers were issued with both colours. Green ammunition pouches were sometimes worn with sand
coloured webbing and vice versa.

British made vehicles and metal items were dark green (Reflective Green). American made vehicles were olive green drab (US Dark Green 70.893).

Insignia
Commandos wore the commando badge on the shoulder. It can be simulated by painting a black circle and adding two vertical and horizontal strokes in red to form #. The unit badge was a curved shape at the top of the shoulder. For commandos, this had a red symbol and white text.

Further Reading
Books
General
Andrew Mollo: The Armed Forces of World War 2 (Little, Brown and Company)
This book is a very useful overview of uniforms and insignia. There are 250 colour drawings and 100 photographs which cover every nation involved in WW2. The original 1981 version is a large format book. There is an A5 reprint that does not include the Eastern front.
Chris McNab: 20th Century Military Uniforms: 300 Uniforms from Around the World (Grange Books PLC)
This book is similar in style to Andrew Mollo’s book and has many of the same illustrations.
Osprey books are also very good but there are several which touch the subject, so it is difficult to recommend one item.
Britain
Martin Brayley: The World War II Tommy: British Army Uniforms European Theatre 1939-45 (The Crowood Press Ltd)
A very useful book with colour photographs showing original uniforms and equipment.
Jean Bouchery: 1944-45 British Soldier: From D-Day to V-Day: Pt. 1 (Histoire & Collections)
Jean Bouchery: 1944-45 British Soldier: From D-Day to V-Day: Pt. 2 (Histoire & Collections)

Taken together these two books are very comprehensive. Part 1 covers uniforms. Part 2 covers vehicles and weapons. Both are illustrated with diagrams and colour photographs showing original uniforms and equipment

Colour Guide – British Infantry

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British Infantry Commonwealth Forces

Item Colour Vallejo Model Colour
Beret Artillery, AFV Black Black 70.950
Beret Infantry Khaki US Field Drab 70.973, English Uniform 70.921, Flat Earth 70.983
Helmet Dark Green Russian Green 70.894, Bronze Green 70.897
Helmet Cover Khaki Green Russian Uniform 70.924
Leather Jerkin Brown Mahogany Brown 70.846, Flat Brown 70.984
Uniform Khaki US Field Drab 70.973, English Uniform 70.921, Flat Earth 70.983
Backpack Khaki Green Russian Uniform 70.924
Backpack straps Beige German Camo Beige 70.821
Webbing & Pouches Sand Iraqi Sand 70.819, Dark Sand 70.847
Webbing (variant) Beige German Camo Beige 70.821
Webbing (variant) Pale Green Deck Tan 70.912, Pastel Green 70.885
Anklets / Gaiters Beige German Camo Beige 70.821
Boots – Officer Tan US Tan Earth 70.874
Boots – Soldiers Black Black 70.950

Notes
British uniforms were consistent over all branches of the army. Commandos, infantry, artillery and many Commonwealth forces engaged in Europe had only slight variations of insignia and beret.

Airborne forces were similar but with the addition of a camouflaged Denison smock jacket. A few specialists’ units also received camouflaged trousers. Khaki cloth was mostly a brown shade and relatively colourfast. Vallejo English uniform 70.921 is very dark and brown, Flat Earth 70.984 or US Field Drab 70.973 are lighter tones. Canadian produced cloth was slightly greener in tone.

Webbing, anklets and ammunition pouches were issued in Sand and Green shades. They were made from were cotton canvas and faded rapidly. In theory, green is correct for the late war period in Europe, but soldiers were issued with both colours. Green ammunition pouches were sometimes worn with sand coloured webbing and vice versa.

British made vehicles and metal items were dark green (Reflective Green). American made vehicles were olive green drab (US Dark Green 70.893).
Insignia
The unit badge was a curved shape at the top of the shoulder. For most infantry regiments this was red background and white text.

Further Reading
Books
General
Andrew Mollo: The Armed Forces of World War 2 (Little, Brown and Company)
This book is a very useful overview of uniforms and insignia. There are 250 colour drawings and 100 photographs which cover every nation involved in WW2. The original 1981 version is a large format book. There is an A5 reprint that does not include the Eastern front.
Chris McNab: 20th Century Military Uniforms: 300 Uniforms from Around the World (Grange Books PLC)
This book is similar in style to Andrew Mollo’s book and has many of the same illustrations.
Osprey books are also very good but there are several which touch the subject, so it is difficult to recommend one item.
Britain
Martin Brayley: The World War II Tommy: British Army Uniforms European Theatre 1939-45 (The Crowood Press Ltd)
A very useful book with colour photographs showing original uniforms and equipment.
Jean Bouchery: 1944-45 British Soldier: From D-Day to V-Day: Pt. 1 (Histoire & Collections)
Jean Bouchery: 1944-45 British Soldier: From D-Day to V-Day: Pt. 2 (Histoire & Collections)
Taken together these two books are very comprehensive. Part 1 covers uniforms. Part 2 covers vehicles and weapons. Both are illustrated with diagrams and colour photographs showing original uniforms and equipment

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British Webbing

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I have decided to paint my British SAS first and two this I am going to have to find out how to find. Denison Camo pattern and what colour is British webbing?

To this end I found this article on the net.

The point of this article is to make people aware that they can greatly improve the appearance of their WW2 British figures by painting the webbing equipment, and to promote more research on the subject of “Blanco“, the use of which affects the colour one might choose.

This is a topic I approach with some trepidation, since the subject of colour always starts arguments, because its interpretation is very subjective; however, I think the information I’ve compiled is quite interesting, and certainly relevant to my own models, and thus might be of interest to others.

British Webbing was all issued in a pale tan /khaki colour, some yellowish, some slightly greenish or neutral. The colour varied somewhat depending on where it was manufactured: typically, the Canadian manufactured versions were a strong yellow ochre shade.

Most of the 1/6th offerings are too pale, and the texture is greatly improved by painting anyway: it unifies the surface of the various fabrics used to make them. Use variations of Vallejo 914 Green Ochre, or 880 Khaki grey, lighter or yellower as you prefer. You can see the problem in this pic:

Image

All soldiers issued with a set of webbing would have applied a commercial cleaner known as “Blanco“ at some time to their own personal webbing: originally developed by Pickerings before the Great War to cover stains on webbing by applying a matching cleaner, this had developed into a range of colours by WW2, and its application could modify the colour considerably. It was used at one extreme to make it look smart, and at the other to help with camouflage.

Image

The different companies producing it ( Pickerings , Properts etc) had their own shades, which were supposed to conform to War Office specifications, but there was inevitable variation.

Which shade was used depended on Regimental practice and Theatre of War. It was not unknown for the battalion to use one colour for parades, and another when posted overseas. Unfortunately, we can never be sure exactly which shade was used from B/W pics, and colour pics are pretty rare, so unless we have veterans’ testimony we shall never know.

These colour pics are an indication, the quality of some of them is pretty dreadful, but they do at least prove the point that webbing was not worn in the pale colour provided by the 1/6th manufacturers:

ImageImage

ImageImage

Most of these appear to show Khaki Green Light.

This one shows a mid-olive: might be faded KG3:
Image

And these chaps, taken in strong sunlight and with a yellow cast I can’t remove with photobucket, may be wearing Buff or Khaki: I doubt they never used Blanco, since this is training at Bovington, and there would be lots of occasions for parades:

Image

I am now certain about four shades: there were definitely several others, but I don’t have exact enough evidence to produce names and matches for them at present.

Here’s a colour chart, with suggested mixes from the Vallejo range: ~

Image

[ERROR: THE SECOND COLOUR DOWN IS ACTUALLY “BUFF ” RATHER THAN KHAKI 61. For the Khaki 61 please look at the top chip, right: Vallejo Khaki grey 880.]

The exact shade would depend on how thickly it was applied.

Broadly, in 1939, as far as we can tell, all the colours were available, and the colour pics we do have suggest that KGL and Khaki were the commonest shades throughout the war: if in doubt, use them.

In the Desert and Sicily, the webbing was scrubbed rather than blancoed, and bleached by the sun, which made it appear a very pale straw colour.

In time for D-Day, and thereafter in N.W Europe and Italy, judging by veterans’ testimony, the dark olive green KG3 seems to have been more popular, though the Khaki and the KGL were also still in use.

Troops in the Far East (essentially Burma & Malaya), who were based in India, originally wore pale Khaki Drill uniforms, and their webbing was coloured to match.

After the initial catastrophic defeats, the uniforms were hastily changed to jungle green, and the webbing vat-dyed to match. It was so damp in Burma that blanco would have been useless anyway (it’s water-soluble). The webbing colour quickly faded to a grey-brown shade.

In the field, replacement items would probably remain in the raw state, and things like Utility pouches, Bren Hoglegs etc. would probably never have been Blancoed in the first place: on a model, it’s best to paint them raw webbing colour.

Troops setting out for a particular operation (typically, the Airborne) or Theatre would almost certainly have travelled with their personal webbing newly blancoed for camouflage: service in the field would have faded and dirtied it pretty quickly.

Snipers in N.W. Europe blancoed their webbing green (probably KG3) in the field for camouflage and painted their brasses with green paint (personal testimony); but I don’t think most other infantry would have bothered in combat zones.

The British Army was inordinately fond of bullshit: for parades, all units would blanco their personal webbing in the shade preferred by the Regiment: these could be rather eccentric shades, such as black or straw yellow, and all brasses would be polished to a mirror finish.

The Military Police always used white webbing, even in combat zones: their role was largely traffic direction and prisoner handling behind the frontline.

Brayley & Ingram’s “WW2 Tommy “ has lots of examples of blancoed webbing, and though many of their pics show a rather chaotic jumble of blancoed and unblancoed items, this is no fault of theirs: the real blanco is very rare collector’s item nowadays, and too precious to be used for preparing parade-finish webbing for a book.

I cannot urge you too strongly, if you want to understand British equipment and uniforms, to get these books:

Brayley & Ingrams:
“The British Tommy in WW2 “; “Khaki Drill & Jungle Green “: both Crowood press.
Brayley: “British Webbing equipments of the two World Wars “Europa Militaria No.22,
Gordon:” The Equipment of the British Soldier “; one of three paperbacks on Uniforms, Weapons and Equipment.

I think it’s worth emphasising that ALL the colours were in use through the war: I’ve found no evidence that everyone on D-Day, for instance, wore KG3, any more than any other colour; or that the BEF all wore pea-green: I would be delighted to be proved wrong if someone can produce better evidence. These ideas, perhaps the result of re-enactment societies’ activities, can achieve the status of urban myths.

To help out, without infringing copyright by copying from books, here are some pics of my own figures to show the variations that were in use in different Theatres: they are result of some research, but are merely an indication of colour, rather than absolute references. All these are rebuilt scale webbing sets rather than straight out of the box, but the colours will work equally well on the commercial versions: ~

Image
BEF 1940, wearing Khaki Green Medium shade 97: mixing this without it looking very bright is tricky, and I admit this might be a bit bright.

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Western Desert: scrubbed and bleached webbing, no Blanco.

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KOYLI 1943: Khaki Blanco, shade 61.

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Officer’s set: Khaki Green Light: this is, I reckon, the commonest colour: we were still using this in the Cadet Force in 1964!

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Dorsets in Normandy: Khaki Green Light again but worn and faded.

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D.of Ws before D.Day : Khaki Green 3: this is real Blanco on this model!
A thick application produces this dark Olive colour.

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A Para at Arnhem: also, KG3, but thinly applied and worn it can look even greyer than this.

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KOSB Officer in Germany 1945: Buff Blanco for Parade (use Vallejo Green Ochre 914). I don’t have a sample of this, but I’ve used it myself, and this is pretty close. Just a bit lighter than Khaki 61.

Finally, two of the figures holding real blanco samples for comparison: thanks to Chris W for these:
Image

_____________________________________________________________

If you go to the trouble of painting the webbing, it might be worth remembering a few other points for authenticity when finishing figures: ~

The groundsheet/cape usually carried beneath the flap of the haversack was issued in pale or mid-khaki: unfortunately, the commercial 1/6th ones are all green. Repaint, or remake from a piece of suitable fabric.

The same applies to the five-pocket rifle ammo bandolier: pale tan, not green.
The e-tool helve should have the metal bayonet fitting at the thin end cut off: these were not really in use before the end of the war.

This figure shows the various colours that might appear on a single man: note the Utility pouches at his feet, still unblancoed :~

Image

This is the Khaki Green Medium Blanco again: rather dirty and worn, and much less bright than the BEF figure.

The gaiters would normally be blancoed the same as the rest of the set. Later versions had leather straps: these were issued as pinkish leather but would be blacked for parades.

Thanks again to everyone for their help: and if you can find any more COLOUR pics, especially showing the Olive shades.

 

Coin Protectors for my Tokens

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Coin Protected TokensCoin Protected Tokens

02 Hundred Hours Starter set comes with over 100 19mm tokens for the game and I wanted to protect them from the rigours of gaming, being drawn from a bag, etc and there are two ways I could have done this.

Firstly, I could have replaced all the tokens with MDF ones, but no one does them at the moment.

Secondly, I could use coin protectors for them.

There is a third version and thats using the technique Gerry used in his Gerry Can, turning the tokens into buttons but I am too lazy for that.

Coin Protectors for my Tokens

So I went for the coin protector and went for Coin Capsules Container Plastic Coin Holder Protect Gasket Coin Case with Storage Organizer Box for Coin Collection Supplies Fit 5 Sizes 17/20/25/27/30mm, with the coin holder case included 100 foam gaskets, adjust the inside diameter of the coin case and prevent coins from shaking and rubbing. The inner diameter of the foam gaskets is 18mm, 21mm,25mm, 27mm and 30 mm, suit for holding most kinds of coins, easy to separate the foam rings from the EVA foam pads based on your coin’s size and put the coin in the capsules.

I thought that they looked smarter than simply just having the tokens in the plastic capsule and yes, it is a matter of taste.

Coin Protectors for my Tokens

You simply punch out the centre EVA form at the size you want, 19/20mm in this case, and then put them into the capsule and close it.

Simples

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Double Post

Videos from Grey for now games on the Game Play

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Videos from Grey for now games on the Game Play

Following are some videos from Grey for Now Games on how to play 02 Hundred Hours

This One from Some Reprobates

All the Miniatures from the Games Assembled

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I have finished assembling and basing all the miniatures for the games plus 4 extra SOE Agents/Partisans. I love the lipped bases that Wargames Atlantic have done with a hole for a 2mm magnet to fit in and it covers the puddle base of the figure too. I have used Vallejo Ground texture for the bases and now they are ready for priming.

The Game and Starter Set

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The Starter BoxThe Starter Box

02 Hundred Hours is a skirmish wargame played with a force of 5-20 models, fighting out night-time raids in World War II.

Field an elite force of SAS Commandos to infiltrate the enemy lines under cover of darkness. Launch attacks on radar stations, munition factories, airfields, bridges and rail lines. Sneak past sentries, take them out with silent attacks, or open fire with a devastating ambush. Plant charges to destroy your objective, assassinate a target or grab vital intel, then fight your way to safety before reinforcements arrive!

Or play as the defenders, carefully setting patrol routes so your sentries can spot raiders in the shadows. Utilise guard dogs, officers or military police and make use of informants and intercepted transmissions to thwart the attackers’ plans.

This product contains:

  • 36 Multi-part 28mm plastic figures:
       12 British SAS
    18 German sentries, officers and Feldgendarmes
    6 guard dogs
  • 64 page Rulebook
  • 80 Gaming Cards
  • 8 Custom Dice
  • 104 Counters
  • 36 Plastic Bases

SAS in North European kit. Equipment includes: Sten guns, Tommy guns, Lee-Enfield rifles (with scoped version), Bren gun, Welrod pistol, De Lisle carbine, Fairbairn-Sykes fighting knives, demo charge and radio operator.

Heer sentries, officers, Feldgendarmes (military police) and guard dog handlers. Armed with ‘Mauser’ rifles, MP40 SMGs and Luger pistols, you can also make figures with torches, binoculars, smoking a cigarette, checking papers, carrying their helmet, saluting and even surrendering!

The British Raiders

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British SASBritish SAS

The British in the set are more dynamic and attacking in their poses as they should be as these are the raiders in the game. Like the Germans they have 6 main bodies and a ton of extras that can be added to them to make them more individual.

SAS in North European kit. Equipment includes: Sten guns, Tommy guns, Lee-Enfield rifles (with scoped version), Bren gun, Welrod pistol, De Lisle carbine, Fairbairn-Sykes fighting knives, demo charge and radio operator.

Again Wargame Atlantic have done a cracking job with these guys and I like them very more.

Lots of very small bits, lolLots of very small bits, lol

The German Guards

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The German GuardsThe German Guards

The Germans is this set are not like your normal WW2 Germans as they are more like your guards and sentries rather than the normal combat troopers. Heer sentries, officers, Feldgendarmes (military police) and guard dog handlers. Armed with ‘Mauser’ rifles, MP40 SMGs and Luger pistols, you can also make figures with torches, binoculars, smoking a cigarette, checking papers, carrying their helmet, saluting and even surrendering!

They are from Wargames Atlantic and they are a lovely set of figures. You get basically 6 main bodies but you can made a ton of individual figures, all of them different. What i love are the dogs that come we the set.

The Starter Box

Tutoring 3
Skill 3
Idea 3
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02 Hundred Hours02 Hundred Hours

I have decided to give up on my Baron’s War project and have decided to move in a different, less colourful direction of the Second World War action direction and have dipped my toes into 02 Hundred Hours, Night Raids in WW2.

I have to confess that I do love the Second World War, mainly because my granddads where involved and fought for England and I loved playing with my Airfix kits and figures when I was young. In fact, the first wargames rules I brought and played with was Airfix’s Second World War rules and I played them to death.

So when these rules came out, it appealed to me as it was small scale skirmish game and I like the Wargames Atlantic plastic figures as they are lovely kits and have a ton of extras with the sprues for both the German Guards and the Bristish SAS.

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