Raise Shields With Tabletop-Art’s Revised Dark Age Selection

April 13, 2021 by brennon

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If you're interested in picking up some alternative shield options for your Dark Age armies, Tabletop-Art has refined their selection for you. There are options for both Viking and Norman armies although you could easily find a use for these in Fantasy games too.

Viking-Shield-Set-1-Tabletop-Art

Viking Shield Set #1 // Tabletop-Art

There are two sets for the Vikings which are cast in white metal so they have some real heft to them. The Vikings can either get themselves these more intricately designed shields or battered and well-worn options for your lowly warriors.

 Viking-Shield-Set-2-Tabletop-Art

Viking Shield Set #2 // Tabletop-Art

All of the details are sculpted into the designs meaning that you will have an easier time painting them. I really like that the folks at Tabletop-Art have designed the two different sets as no shield ever really survives intact when hit by an axe!

Norman Shields

As well as the Viking Shields, we also have a set of Norman Shields which are equally split between more intricately designed and not.

Norman-Shield-Set-1-Tabletop-Art

Norman Shield Set #1 // Tabletop-Art

These classic shields will most likely find their way onto cavalry but you would also have seen some infantry rocking these shields too. The kite design was very good for covering the flank of a horse but it also provides full-body coverage for a solder too.

Norman-Shield-Set-2-Tabletop-Art

Norman Shield Set #2 // Tabletop-Art

I like the designs which give you a look at some of the noble houses that might have joined forces with William The Conqueror. It's fun to see that whilst there are Christian influences within armies of this period, the old pagan roots still hold true in the iconography that soldiers used to protect themselves.

Do you reckon you'll be picking these up?

" It's fun to see that whilst there are Christian influences within armies of this period, the old pagan roots still hold true in the iconography that soldiers used to protect themselves..."

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